A clean list of Odonata names have been uploaded on IBP based on Subramanian, K.A. and Babu, R. (2017). Checklist of Odonata (Insecta) of India. Version 3.0.

Browse Documents

29 documents found
  • Title
    An ecological note on the new record of Cuora amboinensis (Riche in Daudin, 1801) (Reptilia: Testudines: Geoemydidae) in northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study documents the first report on the occurrence of Cuora amboinensis in Cachar and Karimganj districts of the Barak Valley region of southern Assam.
    Attribution
    Kulendra Chandra Das & Abhik Gupta, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 7 (2017); pp. 10459–10462 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1915.9.7.10459-10462
  • Title
    Additions to the Indian dragonfly fauna, and new records of two enigmatic damselflies (Insecta: Odonata) from northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Pseudothemis zonata (Burmeister, 1839) andBurmagomphus divaricatusLieftinck, 1964 are reported for the first time from northeastern India—hitherto not reported from the west of Thailand. The female ofAnisopleura valleiSt. Quentin, 1937, is described for the first time, with new records of this species from four localities in Kohima District, Nagaland, India. Previously, the onlyknown recordof this species wasthe type seriescollected by St. Quentin in1935. We also provide new records ofSchmidtiphaea chittaranjani (Lahiri, 2003) which was previously known only from the holotype.
    Attribution
    Shantanu Joshi, Joyce Veino, Dahru Veino, Lightson Veino, Rakoveine Veino & Krushnamegh Kunte, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 7 (2017); pp. 10433–10444 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3423.9.7.10433-10444
  • Title
    Butterflies of eastern Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The paper provides information on butterfies sampled during random surveys from November 2014 to September2016 from eight reserve forest areas and Dehing-Patkai Wildlife Sanctuary, covering three districts (Tinsukhia, Dibrugarh & Sibasagar) in the eastern part of upper Assam which form part of the Indo-Burma hotspot. The survey revealed 237 species which included 33 species a listed as protected under various schedules of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972 and 58 species that have distribution restricted to the eastern Himalaya and northeastern India in India. An anotated list of 375 species of butterflies so far recorded from eastern Assam that includes a large number of very rare species (Indian Yellow-vein Lancer Pyroneura margherita; Grey-lined Lascar Pantoporia dindinga assamica; Assamese/Conjoined Lascar Pantoporia assamica; Bi-coloured Hedgeblue Udara selma cerima; Vinous Oakblue Arhopala athada aphade; Magnificent Oakblue Arhopala anarte; White Punch Dodona henrici; Pale Striped Dawnfly Capilia zennara; Andaman Yellowbanded Flat Celaenorrhinus andamanicus hanna; Sikkim Ace Halpe sikkima; Baby Swift Polytremis minuta; Maculate Lancer Salanoemia sala; Veined Palmer Hidari bhawani; Pallid Forester Lethe satyavati; Peal’s Palmfly Elymnias peali; Blue Baron Euthalia telchinia; Blue Nawab Polyura schreiber assamensis; Tytler’s Dull Oakblue Arhopala ace arata; Orchid Tit Hypolycaena othona othona; Purple Brown Tailless Oakblue Arhopala arvina ardea; Malayan Bushblue Arhopala ammon ariel and Broad-branded Brilliant Simiskina phalena harterti) along with their site and month of record, endemicity and relative abundance status in India, is provided.
    Attribution
    Singh, A.P. (2017). Butterflies of eastern Assam, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(7): 10396–10420; http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3177.9.7.10396-10420
  • Title
    Deinopis goalparaensis
    Type
    Report
  • Title
    Sighting of Purple-throated-, or Van Hasselt’s Sunbird Leptocoma sperata brasiliana in Karimganj District, Assam, with notes on its status in India
    Type
    Report
    Description
    Describes the observation of the Van Hasselt's Sunbird in Karimganj District of Assam with the first photographic record of this species in India and a discussion of previous records with details of geograhical locations.
    Attribution
    Ismavel, V. A., & Praveen J., 2015. Sighting of Purple-throated-, or Van Hasselt’s Sunbird Leptocoma sperata brasiliana in Karimganj District, Assam, with notes on its status in India. Indian BIRDS 10 (3&4): 104–108.
  • Title
    Avifaunal diversity in Assam University Campus, Silchar, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We conducted a bird survey in the Assam University campus, Silchar from February 2011 to June 2011. A total of 73 species of birds belonging to 56 genera, 32 families and 13 orders was recorded. Significantly, the highest number of bird species restricted to only one particular habitat (17 species) was recorded in the forest area called ‘eco-forest’ (χ2=18, df=3, P<0.01). The highest similarity of bird species was found between degraded area and secondary growth area, and the lowest was found between eco-forest and degraded area. Species richness and dominance of species were more in the eco-forest area. The diversity of species was more in the secondary growth area. Red-vented Bulbul, Spotted Dove and Red-whiskered Bulbul were the most abundant and frequent bird species found in campus. The avifaunal diversity in the study area shows the importance of the University campus as an ideal bird habitat.
    Attribution
    Chakdar Biswajit, Choudhury Parthankar, Singha Hilloljyoti (2016). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(8) pp. 8369-8378; doi:10.11609/jott.2524.8.1.8369-8378
  • Title
    Distribution, habitat utilisation and conservation status of the freshwater crab, Somanniathelphusa zanklon Ng & Dudgeon, 1992 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Gecarcinucidae) endemic to Hong Kong
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Somanniathelphusa zanklon Ng & Dudgeon, 1992 is a tropical freshwater crab currently considered endemic to Hong Kong.  The present study shows that S. zanklon has been found in a variety of lotic and lentic habitats, mostly lowland, slow moving streams and marshes.  The species is more widely distributed than previously known, and potentially occurs outside Hong Kong.  However, its habitat is under threat from development and channelization of watercourses.  The life cycle of the crab requires both slow moving streams and marshes for adults and adjacent terrestrial habitats for brooding females, highlighting the need for integrated conservation of lowland streams and their riparian corridors.  It is hoped that understanding of the species habitat requirements will encourage others to further explore lowland watercourses in the Pearl River Delta and aid in habitat conservation. 
    Attribution
    Stanton David J., Leven Michael R.; Journal of Threatened Taxa Vol 8, No 3 (2016) 26/3/2016; pp. 8564-8574; 10.11609/jott.2070.8.3.8564-8574
  • Title
    Seasonal variations in food plant preferences of reintroduced Rhinos Rhinoceros unicornis (Mammalia: Perrissodactyla: Rhinocerotidae) in Manas National Park, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The food preferences of translocated Rhinos in Manas National Park were studied to find out variations in seasonal and annual preferences. A total of 139 plants species belonging to 39 families were observed to be consumed as food. On an average, grasses (n=33) contributed 24% of Rhino food, aquatic plants (n=23) 16.5%, shrubs (n=11) 7.5%, herbs (n = 31) 22.3% trees (n=26) 18.7%, creepers (n=3) 2.1% and agricultural crops (n=12) 8.6%. Among the grasses, throughout the year Arundo donax, Cynodon dactylon, Imperata cylindrica, Saccharum elephantinus and Saccharum spontaneum were the maximum preferred species. Rhinos were observed to browse shrubs and tree twigs during the winter season and browsing was found to be very limited during the monsoon due to the abundance of young grass. Various anthropogenic pressures such as unregulated grassland burning, cattle grazing, invasions of Bombax ceiba and shrubs like Chromolaena odorata, Leea asiatica and herbs like Ageratum conyzoides have degraded some of the important grasslands. So, a proper grassland management protocol including the burning of grasslands during the dry season, keeping grazing animals away and control of weeds is suggested in the areas extensively used by the Rhinos.
    Attribution
    Deba Kumar Dutta, Pranab Jyoti Bora, Rita Mahanta, Amit Sharma & Anindya Swargowari, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 13 (2016); pp. 9525–9536 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2486.8.13.9525-9536
  • Title
    Traditional home garden agroforestry systems: habitat for conservation of Baya Weaver Ploceus philippinus (Passeriformes: Ploceidae) in Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study was conducted in 18 homegarden agroforestry systems of Assam to assess the role in the conservation of Baya Weaver Ploceus philippinus. Observations were made on the type of host trees, location of host trees, their spatial arrangement pattern, height and diameter of host trees chosen for nesting and the number of complete and helmet stage nests. Trail walks were employed for assessing the encounter rates of predators. A total of 2357 individuals of potential host trees for nesting of P. philippinus were found belonging to Areca catechu (2272), Cocos nucifera (56), Phoenix sylvasticus (13) and Borassus flabellifer (16). According to the spatial arrangement pattern of host trees, among 2272 individuals of A. catechu, 96.5% (n=2192) and 3.5% (n=80) of individuals were arranged in block and row pattern respectively. The other three host trees were arranged in single pattern. Among these 80 individuals of A. catechu planted in row pattern, 47.5% (n=38) had nests (complete and helmet stage) on them. In total, 293 nests (both complete and helmet stage) were observed in A. catechu, out of which, 46.1% (n=135) were complete nests. The other three host trees had nests in various stages of development but none of them were completed by P. philippinus. The encounter rates of predators (arboreal mammals) was significantly higher in block patterns (2.56 ± 0.51) as compared to row patterns (0.53 ± 0.17) of host tree spatial arrangement whereas, the encounter rates of reptiles showed no statistical difference among the two patterns of host tree arrangement. Thus, A. catechu planted in row pattern was the most preferred host tree species for nesting by P. philippinus as compared to the other three host tree species. The height and DBH of A. catechu trees having nests varied from seven to 11 m (7.8 ± 1.11) and 10.5–16.5 cm (12.6 ± 1.4) respectively. The homegarden agroforestry systems provided suitable habitat for survival of P. philippinus as this system has ample water sources, feeding grounds, nesting material and host tree sources and conservation attitudes of the homegarden owners, thus, suggesting that homegarden agroforestry system can be a potential site for conservation of P. philippinus in human-modified land use.
    Attribution
    Yashmita-Ulman, Awadhesh Kumar & Madhubala Sharma, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10076–10083 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3090.9.4.10076-10083
  • Title
    Seroprevalence of Hepatitis A virus infection in non-human primates in Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study investigated 37 serum samples of non-human primates in Assam State Zoo and the Department of Forest and Environment, Govt. of Assam for seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection during the period from December, 2007 to November, 2009. Four serum samples were also collected from animal keepers of the zoo to investigate transmission of the disease to the attendants working with these primates. Competitive ELISA was performed using hepatitis A virus ELISA kit (Wanti Hep. AV) to detect hepatitis A virus antibody in serum samples. Ten (27.21%) of the non-human primate samples and three (75%) human samples had detectable anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies. Living status of the non-human primates (Free living) was a high potential risk for hepatitis A virus infection. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection had significant difference between free living non-human primates and captive non-human primates (P less than 0.05). No significant difference (p=0.86) was seen between male and female non-human primates
    Attribution
    Nath B.G., Chakraborty A., Sarma D.K., Rahman T., Boro P.K. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(5) pp. 4722-4724; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3121.4722-4
  • Title
    Observations on the association of Scaphula deltae Blanford (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in Garanga Wetland of Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    During a survey of the Garanga wetland of Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary, Scaphula deltae Blanford (Mollusca: Bivalvia) was recorded for the first time. Most examples were found over Lamellidens corrianus (Lea) in a firmly attested position. Some were also found clinging to the roots of Eichhornia crassipes. These findings establish a new record of freshwater mollusc association in the study area. Some of the physico-chemical parameters of the study area were also investigated.
    Attribution
    Girindra Kalita, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 5 (2017); pp. 10194–10197 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3512.9.5.10194-10197
  • Title
    The sighting of Mandarin Duck Aix galericulata (Linnaeus) (Aves: Anseriformes: Anatidae) after a gap of 112 years in Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A female Mandarin Duck Aix galericulata was sighted in Saatvoini Beel on February 10, 2014. The female of this species was characterized by grey head, with a white ring around the eye which continued as a streak behind it. In India Mandarin Duck is vagrant and there were very few reported records from India. In 1902, Baker reported six individuals Mandarin Duck on the Subansiri River, Assam. The present sighting of this species from Baksa district is the first reliable record of this species in Assam after a gap of 112 years.
    Attribution
    Das Bipul, Nath Anukul, Talukdar Koutuk, Lahkar Dipankar, Swargiary Gautam, Boro Binay K., Ramchiary Satan, Lahkar Bibhuti P., Ghosh Sonali (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(7) pp. 7710-7011; doi:10.11609/jott.2236.7710-7011